I hope your week is off to a great start.
This week is a very special one for me because at the end of this week, my exclusive pre-launch of my new English coaching program will begin! I’ve been working hard behind the scenes for months to create a new, long-term English coaching program, where I’ll be working with only 10 people. We officially launch next week, but so many people have asked to find out first, I’ve created an Insider’s list- these people will get early access by the end of this week. If you’d like to be put on that list – just hit reply with the word ‘GREAT’ and I’ll add you to it!

Last week I started with a new corporate client in Amsterdam. I was given the opportunity to help 6 people from 6 countries  (including the USA!) shape and share their presentations in English. It was wonderful to work so intensely in such a small group and really dive deep into the subtleties and nuances of communication.

One thing that came up was dealing with fear.
I shared some tips with them, and I know some of you don’t feel totally confident when it comes to speaking in public, so I’d like to share them here as well.

When you think ‘I’m scared….!’ I first want you to think of WHAT KIND OF FEAR you are experiencing.

Are you afraid to fail? Of what could go wrong? Of being laughed at? Of forgetting a word or a phrase? Of having a blackout?

If you are afraid of these things happening, try this.
Write them down.
Make a list of:
1. What could go wrong?
2. What could be the consequence of this?
3. What would that result in?
4. Is that based on an actual fact?
5. How would that make me feel?
6. What would be the concrete result of that?

So…if you are afraid of blacking out, try this.

1. I am afraid of blacking out.
2. This means there might be a few minutes of silence
3. This might mean that people might walk out or laugh
4. Wait. I have never seen anyone walk out of a presentation or laugh at someone during a blackout.
5. This makes me feel like my presentation will not be destroyed if I have a blackout
6. I can deal with having a blackout because I know a few minutes of silence won’t kill me or my audience.

The more you get concrete, specific, and analytical about your fears, the more you can look at them objectively and not emotionally. You will eventually realise that none of them are based on fact, just an emotional snowballing of what could hypothetically go wrong. NONE of it is valid.

But guess what?
YOU are valid.
You have a story to share.
You have value.
And so do your words.
You are worth sitting through a moment of silence for.
Don’t forget that!

I hope this helps you feel more confident in the future!

With love,
Buffi

PS: If you’d like the pre-launch info on my new English coaching program, just hit reply and write ‘GREAT’! I’ll take care of the rest – and watch your mailbox Thursday evening!

Read more!